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N if you didn't don't miss this book' Mail on Sunday 'Sandbrook has created a specific style of narrative history blending high politics social change and popular culture always readable and assured A splendid book' Stephen Robinson Sunday Times 'Sandbrook has a remarkable ability to turn a sow's ear into a sulk purse His subject is depressing but the book itself is a joy Sandbrook is without doubt superb Seasons in the Sun is a familiar story yet seldom has it been told with such verve' Gerard DeGroot Seven 'A brilliant historian I had never fully appreciated what a truly horrible period it was until reading Sandbrook' A N Wilson Spectator 'Nuanced Sandbrook has rummaged deep into the cultural life of the e. A mix of high politics laced with popular culture and sociologyThe 1960s was the decade in which the British public fell in love with the consumer society It was also the decade of the liberation of the individual Unfortunately people paid for these freedoms in the 1970s Drawing on a huge range of sources Sandbrook weaves an effective tale He contrasts the stories of three prime ministers All make doomed attempts to run the economy in partnership with the trade unions And all sustained the UK economy by borrowing not caring about the collapse of the manufacturing sector They all gave into the demands of organised labour In particular Sandbrook identifies Wilson as the villain And Tony Benn plays the pantomime clown At the end of the decade it all led to the collapse of left wing virtues such as collectivity and solidarity The groundwork was thus laid for Thatcher Who promised a narrow consumerist ambition for a better lifeSandbrook enhances his political narrative with the books films and television of the period All offer evidence of a deep malaise A suspicion that we spent too much moral capital That insurrection might lurk around the corner Ultimately though Seasons in the Sun is strong in narrative and anecdote weak in depth and analysis But saying this Sandbrook s prose carries the narrative along The conclusion he is right to argue that the 1970s was the most decisive moment in our recent history Cased Images & Tintypes KwikGuide politics social change and Las Puertas Del Amor popular culture always readable and assured A splendid book' Stephen Robinson Sunday Times 'Sandbrook has a remarkable ability to turn a sow's ear into a sulk Discoveries purse His subject is depressing but the book itself is a joy Sandbrook is without doubt superb Seasons in the Sun is a familiar story yet seldom has it been told with such verve' Gerard DeGroot Seven 'A brilliant historian I had never fully appreciated what a truly horrible Idenics politics laced with Night Owl Loonette popular culture and sociologyThe 1960s was the decade in which the British Deadshifted (Edie Spence, public fell in love with the consumer society It was also the decade of the liberation of the individual Unfortunately El agujero del infierno people The Essential Jim Brickman, Vol. 4 (Piano/Vocal/Chords) paid for these freedoms in the 1970s Drawing on a huge range of sources Sandbrook weaves an effective tale He contrasts the stories of three Teddy prime ministers All make doomed attempts to run the economy in Calling Me Home partnership with the trade unions And all sustained the UK economy by borrowing not caring about the collapse of the manufacturing sector They all gave into the demands of organised labour In The Taint of Lovecraft particular Sandbrook identifies Wilson as the villain And Tony Benn Mr. Francis Wife plays the The Shadow People pantomime clown At the end of the decade it all led to the collapse of left wing virtues such as collectivity and solidarity The groundwork was thus laid for Thatcher Who The Aliens Mate (Warriors of Luxiria, promised a narrow consumerist ambition for a better lifeSandbrook enhances his Degrees of Elevation political narrative with the books films and television of the Demons, Yes--But Thank God for Good Angels period All offer evidence of a deep malaise A suspicion that we spent too much moral capital That insurrection might lurk around the corner Ultimately though Seasons in the Sun is strong in narrative and anecdote weak in depth and analysis But saying this Sandbrook s The Pride and Prejudice Movie Cookbook prose carries the narrative along The conclusion he is right to argue that the 1970s was the most decisive moment in our recent history

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Seasons in the Sun

Dominic Sandbrook's magnificent account of the late 1970s in Britain the book behind the major BB2 series The Seventies The late 1970s were Britain's years of strife and the good life They saw inflation riots the peak of trade union power and also the birth of home computers the rise of the ready meal and the triumph of a Grantham grocer's daughter who would change everything Dominic Sandbrook recreates this extraordinary period in all its chaos and contradiction revealing it as a turning point in our recent history where in everything from families and schools to punk and Doctor Who the future of the nation was being decided Reviews 'Magnificent if you lived through the late Seventies or for that matter eve. I found this a slight disappointment after the truly excellent State of Emergency but I suppose that was to be expected partly because so much recapping was needed but also because I actually clearly remember the events covered so there were fewer surprises The other slighly irritating aspect of the book was the rather small number of sources used to add colour to the account Some added something such as Peter Hall s gradual disillusionment with Socialism as his theatre was crippled by continuous wildcat strikes while others were either the same as in the previous volume or not obviously relevant to the themes of the bookAll in all though an excellent account of a turbulent period in British history which I recommend highly

free download Seasons in the Sun

Ra to remind us how rich it was from Bowie to Dennis Potter Martin Amis to William Golding' Damian Whitworth The Times 'Sharply and fluently written entertaining By making you uite nostalgic for the present Sandbrook has done a public service' Evening Standard About the author Born in Shropshire ten days before the October 1974 election Dominic Sandbrook was educated at Oxford St Andrews and Cambridge He is the author of three hugely acclaimed books on post war Britain Never Had It So Good White Heat and State of Emergency and two books on modern American history Eugene McCarthy and Mad as Hell A prolific reviewer and columnist he writes regularly for the Sunday Times Daily Mail New Statesman and BBC History. This is a fascinating book for anyone that lived through the 1970 s in Britain or anyone that wishes to see how badly the people of Britain have been served by their political masters Sandbrook does an excellent job of deconstructing both the Labour Government of the day and the role of the trade unions in both a humorous and sardonic fashion However the implication that political incompetence and left wing socialism led to a perfect storm that could only be resolved through Thatcherism is rather simple minded Sandbrook tends to consider the 1970 s in isolation cherry picking a particular decade This is history as sound bite interesting but lacking depth and context A compelling read but not great history


10 thoughts on “Seasons in the Sun

  1. says:

    I learned so much from this book I had known there was some kind of financial crisis in the 70s but I didn’t know the circumstances around it or any of the players This book is long but gives so much detail about the era I was so im

  2. says:

    I could a tale unfold whose lightest word would harrow up thy soul freeze thy young blood and make thy two eyes like stars start from their spheres Actually I couldn’t but Dominic Sandbrook can; he has in Seasons in the Sun the Battle for Britain 1974 1979 the seuel to State of Emergency the Way We Were Britain 1970 1974I’m not uite su

  3. says:

    I found this a slight disappointment after the truly excellent State of Emergency but I suppose that was to be expected partly because

  4. says:

    And so Dominic Sandbrook’s history of the sixties and seventies as well as a little bit of the fifties comes to an end Well I say that as it does seem to be his intention to end it now and the arrival of Mrs Thatcher as Prime Minister is a

  5. says:

    I've developed a serious addiction on Sandbrook's sprawling history of postwar Britain SEASONS IN THE SUN profits to this American non sports fa

  6. says:

    A mix of high politics laced with popular culture and sociologyThe 1960s was the decade in which the British public fell in love wit

  7. says:

    While this is no doubt the authoritative book on the period is he being paid by the word ? Several anecdotes are repeated over and over it all seems to be about Wilson being uninterested and moribund as a leader Benn is little than a cartoon figure The Thorpe chapter though is a hoot I'd have liked social history and less politics That said there's not really a better writer for the era

  8. says:

    Update on finishing it I bumped my rating up a star because it did have some better points For example as I mentioned in the comments the section on Grunwick was well done But I still don't like his attitude and most especially the tiresome way that he draws heavily on Tony Benn's diaries yet can't resist making a snide comment every single time he mentions himI haven't finished this yet about halfway through but I'm reviewing it anyway San

  9. says:

    This is a fascinating book for anyone that lived through the 1970's in Britain or anyone that wishes to see how badly the people of Britain have been served by their political masters Sandbrook does an excellent job of deconstructing both the Labour Government of the day and the role of the trade unions in both a humorous and sardonic fashio

  10. says:

    Think of Britain in the mid to late 1970s and a number of grubby images are conjured up militant trade union int

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