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Nëpunësi i Pallati it të Endrrave Ebook or Kindle ePUB by Ismail Kadare


  • Paperback
  • 192
  • Nëpunësi i Pallati it të Endrrave
  • Ismail Kadare
  • English
  • 08 February 2017
  • 9780099518273

10 thoughts on “Nëpunësi i Pallati it të Endrrave

  1. says:

    ”Mark Alem pressed on his mouth dry despite his attempts to reassure himself After all what did it really matter if he d

  2. says:

    I wonder why so few people have read this novel because it's uite amazing I can't say that it's completely original because it reminded me of Kafka The Castle and Saramago All the Names but imagining an institution where people's dreams are analyzed That is a brilliant idea masterfully developed by Ismail KadaréMark Alem comes from a powerful Albanian family the uiprili Köprülü and his relatives decide that he shou

  3. says:

    This is another fascinating story from Ismail Kadare It is a story of the uprilis Turkish Koprulu a noble Albanian family and the Tabir Sarrail the Palace of Dreams a government ministry which wields great unbridled power It reads very much like magical realism but is set against a historical backdropSet in the

  4. says:

    The Palace of Dream by Ismail KadareIf Kafka's The Castle and Orwell's 1984 got freaky with it and had a baby the result would be Kadare's The Palace of Dreams Karade is an Albanian and I would argue that the Palace of Dreams belongs to the long and productive tradition of subversive communist literature that cleverly disguises its critiue in a novel about the fantastic Karade's subversion isn't so disguised; it kind of hits in the face bu

  5. says:

    Kadare's metaphor for a monolithic police state and its workings Set in the late 19th century Ottoman Empire I figured this out from several subtle hints in the novel along with elements from the late 20th century this novel tells of a young man Mark Alem who is employed by the Palace of Dreams the author's surreal intel

  6. says:

    The uniue idea at the heart of this story is instantly intriguing Mark Alem scion of the powerful uprili family is given a job at a prestigious institution the Tabir Sarrail or Palace of Dreams Transcriptions of citizens' dreams are collected here in their thousands then pored over analysed and interpreted for indications

  7. says:

    I put this book down in complete awe I remember feeling the same when I put down Chronicle in Stone Kadare is an amazing writer The Palace of Dreams like most of Kadare's work is political It talks about the Tabir Sarail a secret government agency under the watchful eyes of a totalitarian government that specializes in analyzing dreams of

  8. says:

    In this spare novel Ismail Kadare creates a metaphor for the police state A young distaff scion of a family powerful enough to rival the leaders of Ottoman Empire is given a job in the Palace of Dreams Here a huge machinery gathers the dreams from around the Empire It copies sorts interprets sifts and archives themJust as a thought

  9. says:

    The Palace of Dreams written in Tirana between 1976 and 1981 takes us into an entirely different universe set at the fictitious crossroads of a

  10. says:

    it has disappointed me most of all the end there is so much open things at the end wich lets you the feeling of emptinessAt the begining the complicated description of the Tabir Saray and how it works was so delightful the idea of compilate all the dreams and trying to find the meaning is great the complicated society government and the way of working reminded me to George Orwell 1984 The powerful family wich the main character

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Nëpunësi i Pallati it të Endrrave

S is thus meticulously laid bare and at the mercy of its government The Palace of Dreams is Kadare's macabre vision of tyranny and oppression and was banned upon publication in Albania in 198. I put this book down in complete awe I remember feeling the same when I put down Chronicle in Stone Kadare is an amazing writer The Palace of Dreams like most of Kadare s work is political It talks about the Tabir Sarail a secret government agency under the watchful eyes of a totalitarian government that specializes in analyzing dreams of the citizens The main character Mark Alem belongs to the influential uprili family who have had their share of political trials and tribulations over the yeas He is however not in the least bit interested in pursuing a political career Ironically he is sucked into the very political whirlpool he has always avoided and that his mother sought to protect him from over the yearsDon t be fooled by the synopsis of the book this is no fast paced thriller Yet Kadare manages to keep you interested the whole time with the calm narrativemellifluous prose and of course what he does with the topic of dream analysis and interpretation How he does this I have absolutely no idea The man is a geniusand although this might be impetuous of me to say considering I haven t read ALL his work why on earth hasn t he received the Nobel prize yetSome of my favorite uotes areYes of course there were risks but they were of dream dangers in a world of dreams the very world the Ancients used to wish to be transported to when they were in trouble and cried Oh God let it be only a dreamIn those files was all the sleep in the world an ocean of terror on the vast surface of which they tried to find some tiny signs or signals Hapless wretches that we are Aren t sleep and death close neighbors It was as if dreams no longer dared visit him knowing he d fathomed their secrets and could tell them to go and find someone else to play their tricks onWhat had happened then to life to mankind to everything here below There he smiled inwardly as if at some precious secret there in his files all was so different so beautiful so full of imagination The colors of the clouds the treesthe snow the bridges the chimneys the birds all were so much vivid and strong And the movement of people and things was freer and graceful like stags running the mist defying the laws of space and time How tediousgrasping and confined this world seemed in comparison with the one he now servedThere before him lay the melancholy aggregate of the sleep of one of the vastest empires in the world than forty nationalities representatives of almost all religions and of every race if the report had included the whole globe it wouldn t have made much difference To all intents and purposes it covered the sleep of the entire planet terrible and infinite shadows a bottomless abyss from which Mark Alem was trying to dredge up a few fragments of truth Hypnos himself the Greek god of sleep couldn t have known than he did about dreams

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Translated by Barbara Bray from the French version of the Albanian by Jusuf VrioniAt the heart of the Sultan's vast empire stands the mysterious Palace of Dreams Inside the dreams of every ci. This is another fascinating story from Ismail Kadare It is a story of the uprilis Turkish Koprulu a noble Albanian family and the Tabir Sarrail the Palace of Dreams a government ministry which wields great unbridled power It reads very much like magical realism but is set against a historical backdropSet in the time of the Ottoman Empire the influential and respected uprili family had illustrious members who were Viziers and other important officials Not so for Mark Alem who was rather insignificant without much talent or gumption What he did have was a maternal uprili inheritance but counterbalanced by an Arabic paternal descent He is thrust into a highly sought after career at the Tabir Sarrail The task of the Tabir is to classify and examine the dreams of all citizens without exception The premise is that Allah sends a forewarning to the world through dreams which may come from anybody The Tabir has to sift out ordinary dreams as well as the fake news dreams leaving only the potentially important ones and to interpret these selected dreams Distilled at the end are Master Dreams which determine the future of the empireThe Tabir is a labyrinth of hallways and rooms filled with thousands of nameless staff who stick to fixed routines and run like clockwork It is in this Orwellian environment that the addlepated Mark Alem has to not only survive but to thrive That they collect sort and analyse dreams seems rather odd and could only be allegorical Also symbolic is how Mar Alem keeps losing his way in the Tabirview spoilerThe story is like a game of chess With gambits and sacrifices from both sides of the board It becomes obvious later that the push for Mark Alem is politically motivated Like on a chess board he starts as a lowly pawn from the bottom and gets slowly advanced all the way to the back row to convert to a important chess pieceThere is nothing endearing about Mark Alem but one feels sorry for him as he gets swept along by politics While he had no outstanding ability or wisdom he had insight into his situation Even at the pinnacle of his career he still understood that it could all be taken away just as easily as it came hide spoiler

free read Nëpunësi i Pallati it të Endrrave

Tizen are collected sorted and interpreted in order to identify the 'master dreams' that will provide the clues to the Empire's destiny and that of its Monarch An entire nation's consciousnes. The uniue idea at the heart of this story is instantly intriguing Mark Alem scion of the powerful uprili family is given a job at a prestigious institution the Tabir Sarrail or Palace of Dreams Transcriptions of citizens dreams are collected here in their thousands then pored over analysed and interpreted for indications that they contain some divine prediction a message of glory or doom for the Empire The eventual aim of this mammoth task is to identify the Master Dream the most meaningful and portentous of them all which is delivered to the Sultan on a weekly basis Unsurprisingly the novel has often been compared to the works of Orwell and Kafka Mark Alem s job is bureaucratic yet bizarre and cloaked in so much mystery that at first he doesn t even know what he s supposed to be doing or the way around the vast Palace or what all the oddly named departments do There are recurring scenes in which he wanders the corridors lost and disorientated Parallels are drawn between being swallowed up by this place and the experience of sleep or even death Having become accustomed to its strange ways Mark Alem finds real life comparatively insipid the whole world seemed to have lost all its colour as if after a long illness How tedious grasping and confined this world seemed in comparison with the one he now served Yet when he s at work the dream transcripts often seem incomprehensible to him At times he marks them at random and it s this cavalier approach to the task that ultimately brings about the plot s bloody climax Its meaning as a political allegory is clear but the novel is always eually enjoyable as an imaginative often uite suspenseful storyHad this been a smoother read my rating would be higher as I really liked the story However I thought it had a stilted and awkward feel all the way through and I m convinced this can only be the result of it having been translated twice this English version is not translated directly from the original Albanian but from the the French edition There were a couple of unusual recurring phrases that really jarred and seemed like inaccurate choices certain words were repeated with irritating freuency I found all of this really offputting and I m afraid it also makes me less likely to read Kadare though I d first need to establish whether all of them have been through the weird Albanian French English treatment


About the Author: Ismail Kadare

Ismail Kadare also spelled Kadaré is an Albanian novelist and poet He has been a leading literary figure in Albania since the 1960s He focused on short stories until the publication of his first novel The General of the Dead Army In 1996 he became a lifetime member of the Academy of Moral and Political Sciences of France In 1992 he was awarded the Prix mondial Cino Del Duca; in 2005 he wo